in

Cultivating the Garden

If one penetrates the seams of any society, one tends to discover all of the naked infirmities that have hindered sociopolitical development. Unraveling the veil of Libya’s sociopolitical scheme we may address any issues that continue to prevent social progress.

For over a year now we have extricated ourselves from the despotism of the Gaddafi regime but we have become more aware of the fact that in order for us to perceive any radical changes Libya will require time. Realistically, we must be patient but we mustn’t grow into a comfortable coil of indifference and cold inactivity. It is due to our own indifference that malignant customs continue to subjugate a majority of citizens today. Despite the fact that we have eradicated the Gaddafi regime, we have inherited and enabled their despotic customs but we cannot place the burdens of blame on the necks of dead men for that never changes the condition of things.

Our once noble values and traditions have been metamorphosed into malevolent customs that oppress equality and individuality through the modes of discrimination and intolerance. Women are laden by irrational social norms and risk being harassed at every turn as we fail to safeguard their civil rights. Women may suffer from alienation because their voices are often suppressed by fear of ill judgment. Some are forced to be homemakers and as a result become dormant individual unconscious of the world they live in. But despite that I am glad to see many young women now take part in our nation’s development by their work in media and politics.

To perceive any radical changes Libya will require time. Realistically, we must be patient but we mustn’t grow into a comfortable coil of indifference and cold inactivity.

Freethinkers are met with enmity and violent intolerance. Individuality is deprived of its rigor and before we know it divergent thought becomes nonexistent. We cannot expect development to occur while maintaining some of our most flawed traditions and customs. We, as the youth, must be willing to innovate and to pave the way for positive change. It is essential we safeguard the rights of all citizens of our nation within a constitution. I believe that establishing a just framework for our country will invoke many positive changes. But before any political action is established we must be willing to help one another.

I have witnessed egoism replace national love and social unity. The desire of power and control over one another has led to social divisions but we cannot stand aside and blame the armed militia. The people, in any democracy, are constituents of their governments. We negate our obligations to our country by expecting politicians to bring about change when in reality we are empowered with the ability to invoke social changes. The death of Christopher Stevens (the American ambassador to Libya) earlier this year was a tragedy with some merit. I believe it made all Libyans aware of the destructive effects of intolerance and violence. The majority of Libyans united in opposition to the injustices committed and I believe that if we continue to maintain that noble opposition towards evil we may perchance discern a new Libya in the near future. We cannot expect everything to be done for us. We are endowed with minds that can cultivate the edges of reality. Change must occur within you. What we think we essentially become. There come quintessential moments we must ask ourselves ‘Have I done something for another person today? Have I helped a fellow citizen through a hardship?’ A human being is deprived of purpose when he can no longer be a benefit to humanity. If we can conquer ourselves and erase the traces of egoism, discrimination, and awaken ourselves from indifference then we may in the dawn of a new tomorrow witness a much more beautiful and cultivated garden.

What do you think?

0 points
Upvote Downvote

Total votes: 0

Upvotes: 0

Upvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Downvotes: 0

Downvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Comments

Loading…

Loading…

Comments

comments

Wings of Freedom

“DEMI” track-by-track album review